Your Business Depends on Your Databig data trends 2016 cStor

In today’s business world, leveraging data is mission-critical to fueling competitiveness and growth. How your company provisions and manages data needs to evolve to maintain pace with the demands of your users, and with the nimbleness of your competitors.

Tame Big Data Management Challenges

Learn all the ways cStor experts and industry-leading partners can help you not only tame your big data challenges, but also begin finding new ways to maximize it to streamline operations, improve compliance and in many cases, consolidate to reduce data management costs.


Big Facts About Big Data

big data trends 2016

Public, Private & Hybrid Cloud

INTEGRATED CLOUD SOLUTIONS TRANSFORM THE DATA CENTER INTO A POWERFUL, FLEXIBLE INFRASTRUCTURE

As cloud computing continues to expand, using cloud data management technologies as alternatives to traditional on-premise software is increasingly attractive for businesses that need flexible, easy access to data anytime, anywhere. At the database level, Database as a Service (DaaS) platforms have become viable options for organizations looking to expand in-house database capabilities. Businesses can also leverage quality vendors that offer cloud-based versions of their tools to build up their capabilities for supporting mixed installations of in-house and Software as a Service (SaaS) applications.

How does a company know if data management in the cloud is a good fit for the organization, and vice versa? Cloud data management holds benefits including speeding up technology deployments and reducing both capital expenditures as well as system maintenance costs. Depending on the infrastructure and business needs, it can also provide increased flexibility to help meet changing business requirements.

But like other cloud computing technologies, cloud-based data management introduces potential challenges that can make some organizations cautious about adopting them. Data security concerns are one such area that can create pause, especially for organizations that have heavy compliance requirements and handle sensitive business data outside the corporate firewall for storage.

Application Aware

LEVERAGE APPLICATION AWARE STORAGE TO REVEAL USAGE INTELLIGENCE AND NEEDS


Modern business runs on the power of applications, giving users the ability to effectively and efficiently run any function and perform tasks that run day to day operations. As the number of applications that IT has to support grows, businesses realize there’s a goldmine of information embedded in those applications that can be leveraged in new ways. Application Aware capabilities offer exactly that — systems that have built-in intelligence about relevant applications, their subsystems and their utilization patterns.

Leveraging Application Aware capabilities in both network and storage environments allow the business the ability to optimize where data should reside and where it should flow.  Application Aware capabilities in both environments can be managed on-premise, or via private or public cloud scenarios.

  • Application Aware Networks use current information about applications connected to it, such as application state and resource requirements. That capacity is central to software-defined networking, empowering the network to efficiently allocate resources in order to execute the most effective operations for both applications and the network itself.
  • Application Aware Storage Systems rely upon built-in intelligence about relevant applications and their utilization patterns. Once the storage “understands” the applications and usage conditions, it is possible to optimize data layouts, caching behaviors and quality of service levels.

eDiscovery

USE EDISCOVERY TO ALIGN TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENTS TO KEY BUSINESS PAIN POINTS


Business runs in the digital world, which is why organizations are increasingly putting a higher priority on eDiscovery for enterprise architects and technology decision makers. eDiscovery is the electronic aspect of identifying, collecting and producing electronically stored information.

Although the struggle with aligning business, technology, legal and information management teams is still a common challenge, many companies have operationalized eDiscovery technologies and processes throughout the organization to assist with data management, collection, searches and analysis. Creating a cross-functional, cross-departmental eDiscovery program helps companies better serve their customers and realize their business goals.

Compliance

APPLY RISK AND COMPLIANCE BEST PRACTICES TO MORE EFFECTIVELY WIN, SERVE AND RETAIN CUSTOMERS


Companies Ignore The Risks That May Cause Them To
Fail
Companies rarely fail because of poor financial controls, but they frequently fail due to their inability to understand and address disruptive technologies, market fluctuations, changing customer expectations and competitive pressures. Security and risk professionals have to worry about both sets of risks: those that threaten the company with losses and fines as well as those that threaten their long-term viability. To really improve business performance, companies can expand the fundamentals of their risk and compliance program to the aspects of their company that drive success with customer interactions, which will in turn drive growth and revenue.

If You Want To Support The Business, Focus Compliance Efforts On Customer Success
The fundamentals of compliance that currently apply to financial controls, information security or third-party risk management are just as applicable to the customer-interfacing functions of the business. Businesses that apply risk and compliance best practices throughout their organization are able to more effectively win, serve and retain customers.

Archive

MODERNIZE ARCHIVING STRATEGIES TO BETTER MANAGE BIG DATA AND GET A 360-DEGREE VIEW OF THE BUSINESS


Many organizations fail to see data archiving as part of their business technology agenda because they perceive archiving as highly complex and delivering low business value. But with growing data volume, increasing compliance pressure and the evolution of big data, IT professionals should review their archiving strategies, and leverage new technologies and approaches.

Archiving technologies that store, process and access information help deliver a 360-degree view of the business, product and customer, as well as help meet compliance and governance requirements.  Automating the data archiving process and using purpose-built archive systems also help make production systems run better, use less resources, and reduce overall storage costs. That means production performance is unaffected by information growth, backup and recovery runs faster, disaster recovery is less costly, and systems are far easier to manage. In essence, data moved into archives is stored at much lower cost.

Archive types:

  • On Premises
  • Off Premises
  • Off Premises Tape
  • Cloud Integration

Data Audit & Classification

UNDERSTANDING WHERE DATA LIVES AND HOW IT’S USED TO HELP ORGANIZATIONS REDUCE COSTS WHILE IMPROVING THEIR ABILITY TO COMPETE


Data is the lifeblood of organizations, helping the company understand markets, customers and prospects — as well as how to improve efficiencies and better compete. With big data coming from a growing number of sources, understanding what data lives where and how it impacts the business is increasingly mission critical. An audit and classification initiative helps the organization understand exactly what data sources exist, how they are leveraged throughout the organization, and how certain data types should be identified and tagged so they can be found quickly and efficiently in the future.

Through the audit process, companies benefit from de-duplicating data, which helps reduce storage and backup costs while speeding data searches and related analyses efforts. Classifying data through that process also helps meet legal and regulatory requirements for data storage and retrieval.

But getting big data in order requires a smart strategy designed by enterprise or data architecture experts who can help identify sources, standardize paths to the data, document the data structure and context, apply business rules and communicate the process to relevant stakeholders. Such an initial platform of metadata is then established and replicated to other information stores, creating a clear and well-documented classification taxonomy.

Data audit and classification best practices should include:

  • Specific data and metadata audits to validate quality
  • Removal and/or archiving of non-critical data
  • Management and employee understanding and support of the systems
  • Centralized controls so data is classified in the correct context of larger strategic initiatives

Consolidation

USE EDISCOVERY TO COST-EFFECTIVELY MANAGE THE EXPONENTIAL GROWTH OF DATA

Today’s businesses have seen exponential growth in the amount of data they are required to process and store. And, with increasing regulations comes the need to retain these terabytes of data for decades. This rapid growth in data puts a heavy burden on internal IT systems and staff to keep up with processing, indexing, deduping and searching of the data.

Enter cloud-based eDiscovery systems, which provide a cost-effective, efficient solution to help organizations easily manage, aggregate and search these large amounts of data. What’s more, these platforms offer unparalleled data protection, increased speed and flexibility to scale.